Register update: there will be a delay adding new records during our holiday period (July-Aug)
Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register
Study record
de 2021jFirst Published: 2021 Jan 13Updated Date: 2021 Jun 28

Lung ultrasound score predicts outcomes in COVID-19 patients admitted to the emergency department

  1. Study Type
  2. Observational
  1. Study Aim
  2. Diagnostic/Prognostic
  1. Study Design
  2. Case series/Case control/Cohort
  1. Intervention Assignment
  2. Not Applicable
Reference record

Lung ultrasound score predicts outcomes in COVID-19 patients admitted to the emergency department

de Alencar JCG, Marchini JFM, Marino LO, da Costa Ribeiro SC, Bueno CG, da Cunha VP, Lazar Neto F, Brandao Neto RA, Souza HP, COVID U S P Registry Team
Journal article
Report Results
BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, creating tools to assess disease severity is one of the most important aspects of reducing the burden on emergency departments. Lung ultrasound has a high accuracy for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases; however, there are few prospective studies demonstrating that lung ultrasound can predict outcomes in COVID-19 patients. We hypothesized that lung ultrasound score (LUS) at hospital admission could predict outcomes of COVID-19 patients. This is a prospective cohort study conducted from 14 March through 6 May 2020 in the emergency department (ED) of an urban, academic, level I trauma center. Patients aged 18 years and older and admitted to the ED with confirmed COVID-19 were considered eligible. Emergency physicians performed lung ultrasounds and calculated LUS, which was tested for correlation with outcomes. This protocol was approved by the local Ethics Committee number 3.990.817 (CAAE: 30417520.0.0000.0068). RESULTS: The primary endpoint was death from any cause. The secondary endpoints were ICU admission and endotracheal intubation for respiratory failure. Among 180 patients with confirmed COVID-19 who were enrolled (mean age, 60 years; 105 male), the average LUS was 18.7 ± 6.8. LUS correlated with findings from chest CT and could predict the estimated extent of parenchymal involvement (mean LUS with < 50% involvement on chest CT, 15 ± 6.7 vs. 21 ± 6.0 with > 50% involvement, p < 0.001), death (AUC 0.72, OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.21; p < 0.001), endotracheal intubation (AUC 0.76, OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.26; p < 0.001), and ICU admission (AUC: 0.71, OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.21; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In COVID-19 patients admitted in ED, LUS was a good predictor of death, ICU admission, and endotracheal intubation
Reference record

Lung ultrasound score predicts outcomes in COVID-19 patients admitted to the emergency department

Alencar JC, Brandao Neto RA, Marino LO, Correa Da Costa Ribeiro S, Marchini JF, Souza HP
Journal article
Report Results
RATIONALE During the COVID-19 pandemic, creating tools to assess disease severity is one of the most important aspects of reducing the burden on emergency departments. Lung ultrasound has a high accuracy for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases; however, there are few prospective studies demonstrating that lung ultrasound can predict outcomes in COVID-19 patients. We hypothesized that lung ultrasound score (LUS) at hospital admission could predict outcomes of COVID-19 patients. METHODS This is a prospective cohort study conducted from 14 March through 6 May 2020 in the emergency department (ED) of an urban, academic, level I trauma center. Patients aged 18 years and older and admitted to the ED with confirmed COVID-19 were considered eligible. Emergency physicians performed lung ultrasounds and calculated LUS, which was tested for correlation with outcomes. This protocol was approved by the local Ethics Committee number 3.990.817 (CAAE: 30417520.0.0000.0068). RESULTS The primary endpoint was death from any cause. The secondary endpoints were ICU admission and endotracheal intubation for respiratory failure. Among 180 patients with confirmed COVID-19 who were enrolled (mean age, 60 years; 105 male), the average LUS was 18.7 ± 6.8. LUS correlated with findings from chest CT and could predict the estimated extent of parenchymal involvement (mean LUS with < 50% involvement on chest CT, 15±6.7 vs. 21±6.0 with >50% involvement, p<0.001), death (AUC 0.72, OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.21; p < 0.001), endotracheal intubation (AUC 0.76, OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.26; p < 0.001), and ICU admission (AUC: 0.71, OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.21; p < 0.001). CONCLUSION In this study, LUS was a good predictor of death, ICU admission, and endotracheal intubation in patients with COVID-19 admitted in ED. The study provides support for further research, ideally combining clinical, laboratory, and imaging parameters, to estimate the risk of poor outcomes from COVID-19 infection. [This record is from Embase.com and was provided under license by Elsevier. All rights are retained by the license holder.]
Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved