Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register
van 2021h

Can continuous remote vital sign monitoring reduce the number of room visits to patients suspected of COVID-19: a quasi-experimental study

  1. Study Type
  2. Observational
  3. Qualitative
  1. Study Aim
  2. Health Services Research
  1. Study Design
  2. Time Series
  1. Intervention Assignment
  2. Not Applicable

Can continuous remote vital sign monitoring reduce the number of room visits to patients suspected of COVID-19: a quasi-experimental study

van Goor HMR, Eddahchouri Y, van Loon K, Bredie SJH, Schoonhoven L, Kaasjager HAH, van Goor H
Journal article
Report Results
BACKGROUND: Continuous remote monitoring of vital signs on the hospital ward gained popularity during the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic due to its ability to support early detection of respiratory failure, and the possibility to do so without physical contact between patient and clinician. The effect of continuous monitoring on patient room visits has not been established yet. OBJECTIVES: To assess the impact of continuous monitoring on the number of patient room visits for patients suspected of Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the use of personal protection equipment. DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed a before-after study at a ward with private rooms for patients suspected of COVID-19 at a tertiary hospital in Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Non-participant observers observed hospital staff during day, evening and night shifts to record patient room visits and personal protection equipment usage. After eleven days, wearable continuous vital sign monitoring was introduced. An interrupted time series analysis was applied to evaluate the effect of continuous monitoring on the number of patient room visits, visits for obtaining vital signs (Modified Early Warning Score visits) and the amount of personal protection equipment used. RESULTS: During the 45 day study period, 86 shifts were observed. During each shift, approximately six rooms were included. A total of 2347 patient room visits were recorded. The slope coefficient for the number of patient room visits did not change after introducing continuous vital sign monitoring (B -0.003, 95% confidence interval -0.022/0.016). The slope coefficients of the number of Modified Early Warning Score visits and the amount of personal protection equipment used did not change either (B -0.002, 95% confidence interval -0.021/0.017 and B 0.046, 95% confidence interval -0.008/0.099). The number of Modified Early Warning Score visits did show a decline over the entire study period, however this decline was not influenced by the intervention. Evening and night shifts were associated with fewer patient room visits compared to day shifts. CONCLUSION: Introduction of continuous vital sign monitoring at a general ward for patients with suspected COVID-19 did not reduce the number of patient room visits or the usage of personal protection equipment by hospital staff. The number of Modified Early Warning Score visits declined over time, but this was not related to the introduction of continuous monitoring. Detailed analysis of the influence of continuous monitoring on the workflow of hospital staff reveals key points to increase efficacy of this intervention