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Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register
Study record
Patnaik 2021First Published: 2021 Jul 21Updated Date: 2021 Jul 21

Short-term Outcomes in Children Recovered from Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection (preprint)

  1. Study Type
  2. Observational
  1. Study Aim
  2. Diagnostic/Prognostic
  1. Study Design
  2. Case series/Case control/Cohort
  1. Intervention Assignment
  2. Not Applicable
Reference record

Short-term Outcomes in Children Recovered from Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection (preprint)

Patnaik S, Jain MK, Ahmed S, Dash AK, P RK, Sahoo B, Mishra R, Behera MR
Unpublished article (preprint)
Report Results
Background: Multi System Inflammatory Syndrome in children (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19 is a recently recognised potentially life-threatening entity. There is limited data on post MIS-C sequelae. Methods: 21 children fulfilling the WHO criteria for MIS-C were included in our study. Data was collected at baseline and at 12-16 weeks post discharge to look for any persistent sequelae mainly relating to the lungs or heart including coronary arteries. Results: Fever was the most common presentation found in 18 (85.7%) patients. All had marked hyper-inflammatory state. Low ejection fraction (EF) was found in 10 (47.6%) but none had any coronary artery abnormality. All received corticosteroids while 7 (33.3%) children required additional treatment with intravenous Immunoglobulins. 20 children improved while 1 left against medical advice. At discharge 3 children had impaired left ventricular function. At median 15 weeks follow-up no persistent complications were found. EF had returned to normal and no coronary artery abnormalities were found during repeat echocardiography. Chest radiographs showed no fibrosis and all biochemical parameters had normalized. Conclusion: The children with MIS-C are extremely sick during the acute stage. Timely and adequate management led to full recovery without any sequelae at a median follow-up of 15 weeks.Competing Interest StatementThe authors have declared no competing interest.Funding StatementNO FUNDINGAuthor DeclarationsI confirm all relevant ethical guidelines have been followed, and any necessary IRB and/or ethics committee approvals have been obtained.YesThe details of the IRB/oversight body that provided approval or exemption for the research described are given below:Institutional Ethics Committee, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar APPROVEDAll necessary patient/participant consent has been obtained and the appropriate institutional forms have been archived.YesI understand that all clinical trials and any other prospective interventional studies must be registered with an ICMJE-approved registry, such as ClinicalTrials.gov. I confirm that any such study reported in the manuscript has been registered and the trial registration ID is provided (note: if posting a prospective study registered retrospectively, please provide a statement in the trial ID field explaining why the study was not registered in advance).Yes I have followed all appropriate research reporting guidelines and uploaded the relevant EQUATOR Network research reporting checklist(s) and other pertinent material as supplementary files, if applicable.YesAVAILABLE [Preprints are preliminary reports of work that have not been peer reviewed. Refer to the original preprint or preprint server for specific information about the individual preprint.]
Reference record

Short-term outcomes in children recovered from multisystem inflammatory syndrome associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection

Patnaik S, Jain MK, Ahmed S, Dash AK, P RK, Sahoo B, Mishra R, Behera MR
Journal article
Report Results
Multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19 is a recently recognised potentially life-threatening entity. There is limited data on post-MIS-C sequelae. 21 children fulfilling the WHO criteria for MIS-C were included in our study. Data were collected at baseline and at 12-16 weeks post-discharge to look for any persistent sequelae mainly relating to the lungs or heart including coronary arteries. Fever was the most common presentation, found in 18 (85.7%) patients. All had a marked hyper-inflammatory state. Low ejection fraction (EF) was found in 10 (47.6%), but none had any coronary artery abnormality. All received corticosteroids, while 7 (33.3%) children required additional treatment with intravenous Immunoglobulins. 20 children improved while 1 left against medical advice. At discharge, 3 children had impaired left ventricular function. At median 15 weeks' follow-up, no persistent complications were found. EF had returned to normal and no coronary artery abnormalities were found during repeat echocardiography. Chest radiographs showed no fibrosis and all biochemical parameters had normalized. The children with MIS-C are extremely sick during the acute stage. Timely and adequate management led to full recovery without any sequelae at a median follow-up of 15 weeks