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Study record
Wu 2021boFirst Published: 2021 Jul 21Updated Date: 2021 Jul 21

Wastewater Surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 across 40 U.S. states (preprint)

  1. Study Type
  2. Observational
  1. Study Aim
  2. Epidemiology
  1. Study Design
  2. Other
  1. Intervention Assignment
  2. Not Applicable
Reference record

Wastewater Surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 across 40 U.S. states (preprint)

Wu F, Xiao A, Zhang J, Moniz K, Endo N, Armas F, Bushman M, Chai PR, Duvallet C, Erickson TB, Foppe K, Ghaeli N, Gu X, Hanage WP, Huang KH, Lee WL, Matus M, McElroy KA, Rhode SF, Wuertz S, Thompson J, Alm EJ
Unpublished article (preprint)
Report Results
Wastewater-based disease surveillance is a promising approach for monitoring community outbreaks. Here we describe a nationwide campaign to monitor SARS-CoV-2 in the wastewater of 159 counties in 40 U.S. states, covering 13% of the U.S. population from February 18 to June 2, 2020. Out of 1,751 total samples analyzed, 846 samples were positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA, with overall viral concentrations declining from April to May. Wastewater viral titers were consistent with, and appeared to precede, clinical COVID-19 surveillance indicators, including daily new cases. Wastewater surveillance had a high detection rate (>80%) of SARS-CoV-2 when the daily incidence exceeded 13 per 100,000 people. Detection rates were positively associated with wastewater treatment plant catchment size. To our knowledge, this work represents the largest-scale wastewater-based SARS-CoV-2 monitoring campaign to date, encompassing a wide diversity of wastewater treatment facilities and geographic locations. Our findings demonstrate that a national wastewater-based approach to disease surveillance may be feasible and effective.Competing Interest StatementMM and NG are cofounders of Biobot Analytics. EJA is advisor to Biobot Analytics. CD, KAM, KF, and NE are employees at Biobot Analytics, and all these authors hold shares in the company.Funding StatementThis work was supported by the Center for Microbiome Informatics and Therapeutics and Intra-CREATE Thematic Grant (Cities) grant NRF2019-THE001-0003a to JT and EJA; National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health award numbers K23DA044874; and R44DA051106 to MM and PRC, Hans and Mavis Psychosocial Foundation funding, and e-ink corporation funding to PRC; funding from the Morris-Singer Foundation and NIH award R01AI106786 to WPH; funds from the Massachusetts Consortium on Pathogen Readiness and China Evergrande Group to TBE, PRC, MM, and EJA; funding from the Singapore Ministry of Education and National Research Foundation through an RCE award to Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering (SCELSE) to SW and JT. Author DeclarationsI confirm all relevant ethical guidelines have been followed, and any necessary IRB and/or ethics committee approvals have been obtained.YesThe details of the IRB/oversight body that provided approval or exemption for the research described are given below:NAAll necessary patient/participant consent has been obtained and the appropriate institutional forms have been archived.YesI understand that all clinical trials and any other prospective interventional studies must be registered with an ICMJE-approved registry, such as ClinicalTrials.gov. I confirm that any such study reported in the manuscript has been registered and the trial registration ID is provided (note: if posting a prospective study registered retrospectively, please provide a statement in the trial ID field explaining why the study was not registered in advance).Yes I have followed all appropriate research reporting guidelines and uploaded the relevant EQUATOR Network research reporting checklist(s) and other pertinent material as supplementary files, if applicable.YesThe data presented in the figures, and the code for the analysis, and that support the other findings of this study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request. [Preprints are preliminary reports of work that have not been peer reviewed. Refer to the original preprint or preprint server for specific information about the individual preprint.]
Reference record

Wastewater surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 across 40 U.S. states from February to June 2020

Wu F, Xiao A, Zhang J, Moniz K, Endo N, Armas F, Bushman M, Chai PR, Duvallet C, Erickson TB, Foppe K, Ghaeli N, Gu X, Hanage WP, Huang KH, Lee WL, McElroy KA, Rhode SF, Matus M, Wuertz S, Thompson J, Alm EJ
Journal article
Report Results
Wastewater-based disease surveillance is a promising approach for monitoring community outbreaks. Here we describe a nationwide campaign to monitor SARS-CoV-2 in the wastewater of 159 counties in 40 U.S. states, covering 13% of the U.S. population from February 18 to June 2, 2020. Out of 1,751 total samples analyzed, 846 samples were positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA, with overall viral concentrations declining from April to May. Wastewater viral titers were consistent with, and appeared to precede, clinical COVID-19 surveillance indicators, including daily new cases. Wastewater surveillance had a high detection rate (>80%) of SARS-CoV-2 when the daily incidence exceeded 13 per 100,000 people. Detection rates were positively associated with wastewater treatment plant catchment size. To our knowledge, this work represents the largest-scale wastewater-based SARS-CoV-2 monitoring campaign to date, encompassing a wide diversity of wastewater treatment facilities and geographic locations. Our findings demonstrate that a national wastewater-based approach to disease surveillance may be feasible and effective