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Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register
Study record
Buising 2021First Published: 2021 Jul 21Updated Date: 2021 Jul 21

Use of portable air cleaners to reduce aerosol transmission on a hospital COVID-19 ward (preprint)

  1. Study Type
  2. Observational
  1. Study Aim
  2. Prevention
  3. Health Services Research
  1. Study Design
  2. Case Report
  1. Intervention Assignment
  2. Not Applicable
Reference record

Use of portable air cleaners to reduce aerosol transmission on a hospital coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) ward

Buising KL, Schofield R, Irving L, Keywood M, Stevens A, Keogh N, Skidmore G, Wadlow I, Kevin K, Rismanchi B, Wheeler AJ, Humphries RS, Kainer M, Monty J, McGain F, Marshall C
Journal article
Report Results
OBJECTIVE: To study the airflow, transmission, and clearance of aerosols in the clinical spaces of a hospital ward that had been used to care for patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and to examine the impact of portable air cleaners on aerosol clearance. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: A single ward of a tertiary-care public hospital in Melbourne, Australia. INTERVENTION: Glycerin-based aerosol was used as a surrogate for respiratory aerosols. The transmission of aerosols from a single patient room into corridors and a nurses' station in the ward was measured. The rate of clearance of aerosols was measured over time from the patient room, nurses' station and ward corridors with and without air cleaners [ie, portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters]. RESULTS: Aerosols rapidly travelled from the patient room into other parts of the ward. Air cleaners were effective in increasing the clearance of aerosols from the air in clinical spaces and reducing their spread to other areas. With 2 small domestic air cleaners in a single patient room of a hospital ward, 99% of aerosols could be cleared within 5.5 minutes. CONCLUSIONS: Air cleaners may be useful in clinical spaces to help reduce the risk of acquisition of respiratory viruses that are transmitted via aerosols. They are easy to deploy and are likely to be cost-effective in a variety of healthcare settings
Reference record

Use of portable air cleaners to reduce aerosol transmission on a hospital COVID-19 ward (preprint)

Buising KL, Schofield R, Irving L, Keywood M, Stevens A, Keogh N, Skidmore G, Wadlow I, Kevin K, Rismanchi B, Wheeler A, Humphries R, Kainer M, McGain F, Monty J, Marshall C
Unpublished article (preprint)
Report Results
Objective To study the airflow, transmission and clearance of aerosols in the clinical spaces of a hospital ward that had been used to care for patients with COVID-19, and to examine the impact of portable air cleaners on aerosol clearance. Design Observational study Setting A single ward of a tertiary public hospital in Melbourne Australia Intervention Glycerine-based aerosol was used as a surrogate for respiratory aerosols. The transmission of aerosols from a single patient room into corridors and a nurses station in the ward was measured. The rate of clearance of aerosols was measured over time from the patient room, nurses station and ward corridors with and without air cleaners (also called portable HEPA filters). Results Aerosols rapidly travelled from the single patient room into other parts of the ward. Air cleaners were effective in increasing the clearance of aerosols from the air in clinical spaces and reducing their spread to other areas. Conclusion Air cleaners may be useful in clinical spaces to help reduce the risk of healthcare acquired acquisition of respiratory viruses that are transmitted via aerosols.Competing Interest StatementThe authors have declared no competing interest.Funding StatementThe work was funded by the Royal Melbourne HospitalAuthor DeclarationsI confirm all relevant ethical guidelines have been followed, and any necessary IRB and/or ethics committee approvals have been obtained.YesThe details of the IRB/oversight body that provided approval or exemption for the research described are given below:The Royal Melbourne Hospital human research ethics committee reviewed the manuscript and determined that it was exempt from requiring ethics approvalAll necessary patient/participant consent has been obtained and the appropriate institutional forms have been archived.YesI understand that all clinical trials and any other prospective interventional studies must be registered with an ICMJE-approved registry, such as ClinicalTrials.gov. I confirm that any such study reported in the manuscript has been registered and the trial registration ID is provided (note: if posting a prospective study registered retrospectively, please provide a statement in the trial ID field explaining why the study was not registered in advance).Yes I have followed all appropriate research reporting guidelines and uploaded the relevant EQUATOR Network research reporting checklist(s) and other pertinent material as supplementary files, if applicable.YesThe data are held by the researchers at the University of Melbourne [Preprints are preliminary reports of work that have not been peer reviewed. Refer to the original preprint or preprint server for specific information about the individual preprint.]