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Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register
Study record
Mazzeo 2022First Published: 2022 Aug 5Updated Date: 2022 Aug 5

A Tale of Two Cities During the COVID-19 Pandemic: evaluating Food Insecurity in Chicago and New York City

  1. Study Type
  2. Observational
  1. Study Aim
  2. Other
  1. Study Design
  2. Cross-sectional
  1. Intervention Assignment
  2. Not Applicable
Reference record

A Tale of Two Cities During the COVID-19 Pandemic: evaluating Food Insecurity in Chicago and New York City

Mazzeo J, Al Abdeen Qusair Z, Gadhoke P, Freiberg T, Brenton BP, Sedlacek A, Torres A
Journal article
Report Results
BACKGROUND: COVID-19 revealed and broadened existing disparities in large cities. This article interprets the early impacts of COVID-19 on food insecurity (FI) in the Chicago and New York City (NYC) metropolitan areas for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) and provides a study using a Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) framework. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey adapted from the National Food Access and COVID Research Team (NFACT) was deployed in Chicago (N = 680) and in NYC (N = 525) during summer 2020 and oversampled for race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Multivariate binary logistic regression generated adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% CIs for FI and select SDOH variables, which was conducted on each dataset. RESULTS: The prevalence of FI in NYC increased to 66.8% (from 57.8%) and in Chicago to 44.8% (from 41.0%). While higher income protected against FI before, protection was diminished or eliminated since COVID-19. FI declined for households with children in NYC while odds increased and became significant in Chicago. Respondents with chronic health conditions experienced increased odds of FI since COVID. In Chicago, this variable had the highest odds of FI. Respondents with depression or anxiety had increased odds of FI. In NYC, depression had the highest odds of FI. Females in NYC were protected against FI. Hispanics in NYC lost protection against FI from before to since COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Results support the observed rise of FI for BIPOC and its association with health status. The analysis has multifaceted, structural policy implications for reducing FI in urban centers